southern california

EMAIL / BIO / MOOD

Claudia Cano is a multidisciplinary artist with a background in photography, mass media and advertising. Her studies include developing projects involving cross-­‐cultural influences between the Mexican – American border, diversity and contemporary womanhood. Cano has been impersonating and analyzing immigrant Mexican women living and working in the United States. Through performance, she creates awareness of invisible people that rises above their limitations and achieves everyday imperceptible tasks to make life better. She took on the character of a cleaning lady and created an alternative life, her alter ego. Rosa Hernandez, La Chacha (The cleaning lady) She does not speak English; she is humble, with strong values she will serve like many immigrants do. Rosa wears the traditional uniform of a Mexican maid working for an upper class family, having a scapular. She wears a pair of white tennis shoes bought from a thrift store and a long ponytail as a symbol of her agricultural roots. She cleans, dusts, cooks, vacuums, for a requested audience. Language barrier, time and endurance challenge the viewer to become a participant either silently or taking the “boss’s role”. The piece plays on the sense of real or unreal, provoking the audience and bringing awareness of ethnicity and social roles in a city where hard working immigrants are unnoticed.
via Exploring Engagement - Rosa Hernandez

Claudia Cano is a multidisciplinary artist with a background in photography, mass media and advertising. Her studies include developing projects involving cross-­‐cultural influences between the Mexican – American border, diversity and contemporary womanhood. Cano has been impersonating and analyzing immigrant Mexican women living and working in the United States. Through performance, she creates awareness of invisible people that rises above their limitations and achieves everyday imperceptible tasks to make life better. She took on the character of a cleaning lady and created an alternative life, her alter ego. Rosa Hernandez, La Chacha (The cleaning lady) She does not speak English; she is humble, with strong values she will serve like many immigrants do. Rosa wears the traditional uniform of a Mexican maid working for an upper class family, having a scapular. She wears a pair of white tennis shoes bought from a thrift store and a long ponytail as a symbol of her agricultural roots. She cleans, dusts, cooks, vacuums, for a requested audience. Language barrier, time and endurance challenge the viewer to become a participant either silently or taking the “boss’s role”. The piece plays on the sense of real or unreal, provoking the audience and bringing awareness of ethnicity and social roles in a city where hard working immigrants are unnoticed.

via Exploring Engagement - Rosa Hernandez

Gabriel Kuri 

Made in LA at the Hammer

Most art is fragile and some should be placed and never moved away. – Donald Judd

Let me just get this out of the way – I do not like clowns. I went to a circus once in 1995 and I never looked back. But when I came across the Egg Registry in some tangential research, I became fascinated with its existence.

In an email to VICE magazine, photographer Luke Stephenson (who has taken on the task of cataloging some 300 of the eggs) describes the Egg Registry best:

“It’s a selection of about 300 porcelain eggs from the collection held by the UK-based Clowns International, the oldest clown society in the world. When you are a clown and you join the society you get the chance to have your face registered by getting it painted on an egg, which then acts like a clown copyright. Then the eggs are displayed in the Clowns Museum in Wookey Hole, Somerset, England for eternal glory.”

That’s right. Eternal, freaky, uncanny glory.

CULT CRAFTS OF SUMMER #CLOWN EGGS | CARETS AND STICKS

Most art is fragile and some should be placed and never moved away. – Donald Judd

Let me just get this out of the way – I do not like clowns. I went to a circus once in 1995 and I never looked back. But when I came across the Egg Registry in some tangential research, I became fascinated with its existence.

In an email to VICE magazine, photographer Luke Stephenson (who has taken on the task of cataloging some 300 of the eggs) describes the Egg Registry best:

“It’s a selection of about 300 porcelain eggs from the collection held by the UK-based Clowns International, the oldest clown society in the world. When you are a clown and you join the society you get the chance to have your face registered by getting it painted on an egg, which then acts like a clown copyright. Then the eggs are displayed in the Clowns Museum in Wookey Hole, Somerset, England for eternal glory.”

That’s right. Eternal, freaky, uncanny glory.

CULT CRAFTS OF SUMMER #CLOWN EGGS | CARETS AND STICKS

Newton Harrison

And I asked
What is in this casket that is so marvelous

He answered why the tooth       of course

(and I heard the truth)

So I asked
Do you ever open this casket
and reveal the truth
(and he heard the tooth)

And he said            every ten years